Mineral Drink Light – Key Ingredients & Information

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Fructose, Sucrose and Glucose and why we only choose the best for your health

Fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple ketonic monosaccharide found in many plants, where it is often bonded to glucose to form the disaccharide sucrose. It is one of the three dietary monosaccharides, along with glucose and galactose, that are absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. Fructose was discovered by French chemist Augustin-Pierre Dubrunfaut in 1847. The name “fructose” was coined in 1857 by the English chemist William Miller. Pure, dry fructose is a very sweet, white, odourless, crystalline solid and is the most water-soluble of all the sugars. Fructose is found in honey, tree and vine fruits, flowers, berries, and most root vegetables.

All forms of fructose, including fruits and juices, are commonly added to foods and drinks for palatability and taste enhancement, and for browning of some foods, such as baked goods.

The primary reason that fructose is used commercially in foods and beverages, besides its low cost, is its high relative sweetness. It is the sweetest of all naturally occurring carbohydrates. In general, fructose is regarded as being 1.73 times as sweet as sucrose.

Fructose

Fructose is often recommended for diabetics because it does not trigger the production of insulin by pancreatic β cells, probably because β cells have low levels of GLUT5, although the net effect for both diabetics and non-diabetics is debated. Fructose has a very low glycemic index of 19 ± 2, compared with 100 for glucose and 68 ± 5 for sucrose. Fructose is also 73% sweeter than sucrose at room temperature, so diabetics can use less of it. Studies show that fructose consumed before a meal may even lessen the glycemic response of the meal.

Dextrose

Dextrose is a simple sugar that occurs naturally in the body and is the body’s main source of energy. This sweet substance does wonders for the body when used in moderation.

What Is Dextrose Used For?

Dextrose, also known as glucose, is found in the blood and used in various cellular processes, such as cellular respiration and glycolysis. It is used in medical applications when a patient is unable to consume enough liquids, or to help with the injection of other medicines. It is also used as an artificial sweetener in some foods.

Citric Acid

Citric acid is a weak organic acid. It is a natural preservative which occurs naturally in citrus fruits and is also used to add an acidic or sour taste to foods and drinks.The dominant use of citric acid is as a flavouring and preservative in food and beverages, especially soft drinks.

Sodium Citrate

Sodium citrate is sometimes used as an acidity regulator in drinks.

Potassium citrate

Is a potassium salt of citric acid with the molecular formula C6H5K3O7. It is a white, slightly hygroscopic crystalline powder. It is odourless with a saline taste. It contains 38.3% potassium by mass.

As a food additive, potassium citrate is used to regulate acidity and is known as E number E332. Medicinally, it may be used to control kidney stones derived from either uric acid or cystine.

It is also used in many soft drinks as a buffering agent. (A buffering agent is a weak acid or base used to maintain the acidity (pH) of solution near a chosen value after the addition of another acid or base. That is, the function of a buffering agent is to prevent a rapid change in pH when acids or bases are added to the solution. Buffering agents have variable properties—some are more soluble than others; some are acidic while others are basic. As pH managers, they are important in many chemical applications, including agriculturefood processingbiochemistrymedicine and photography.)

Potassium phosphate

Is a generic term for the salts of potassium and phosphate ions.

Magnesium carbonate

Mg is an inorganic salt that is a white solid. Several hydrated and basic forms of magnesium carbonate also exist as minerals.

As a food additive magnesium carbonate is known as E504, for which the only known side effect is that it may work as a laxative in high concentrations.

L- Glycine

Among the 22 amino acids vital for our body to function and manufacture proteins, glycine is the smallest and simplest, with only a single hydrogen forming its side chain. Abbreviated at G or Gly, this amino acid has the chemical formula NH2CH2COOH.  It’s the second most widespread amino acid found in human enzymes and proteins.

Glycine is biosynthesised in the liver from the amino acids, serine and threonine. As a solid, it’s a sweet tasting crystalline substance and the principle amino acid within cane sugar. In humans, it’s found in high concentrations within the skin, connective tissues and muscle tissues.

Glycine has several important roles within the body. It’s essential for the production of many different acids, including nucleic acids, bile acids, creatine phosphate and porphyrins. On a broader scale, glycine is involved in the regulation and support of many essential processes.

This amino acid is closely associated with the central nervous system and the digestive system. Glycine helps with the breakdown of fat by regulating the concentration of bile acids. Glycine is also required for the biosynthesis of heme, which is a key component of haemoglobin. Haemoglobin is essential in the maintenance of red blood cell integrity and optimal oxygen carrying capacity.

Due to the range of functions performed by glycine, this amino acid has proven to be important in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, as well as supporting overall well-being. Some of the benefits of glycine are outlined below.

L- Arginine

L-arginine is a chemical building block called “an amino acid.” It is obtained from the diet and is necessary for the body to make proteins. L-arginine is found in red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. It can also be made in a laboratory and used as medicine.

L-arginine is used for heart and blood vessel conditions including congestive heart failure (CHF), chest pain, high blood pressure, and coronary artery disease. L-arginine is also used for recurrent pain in the legs due to blocked arteries (intermittent claudication), decreased mental capacity in the elderly (senile dementia), erectile dysfunction (ED), and male infertility.

Some people use L-arginine for preventing the common cold, improving kidney function after a kidney transplant, high blood pressure during pregnancy (pre-eclampsia), improving athletic performance, boosting the immune system, and preventing inflammation of the digestive tract in premature infants.

L-arginine is used in combination with a number of over-the-counter and prescription medications for various conditions. For example, L-arginine is used along with ibuprofen for migraine headaches; with conventional chemotherapy drugs for treating breast cancer; with other amino acids for treating weight loss in people with AIDS; and with fish oil and other supplements for reducing infections, improving wound healing, and shortening recovery time after surgery.

Some people apply L-arginine to the skin to speed wound healing and for increasing blood flow to cold hands and feet, especially in people with diabetes. It is also used as a cream for sexual problems in both men and women. Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen and calcium.

As a food additive it is designated E170; INS number 170. Used as an acidity regulator, anticaking agent, stabiliser or colour it is approved for usage in the EU, USA, and Australia and New Zealand. It is used in some soy milk and almond milk products as a source of dietary calcium; one study suggests that calcium carbonate might be as bioavailable as the calcium in cow’s milk. Calcium carbonate is also used as a firming agent in many canned or bottled vegetable products.

Acesulfame Potassium

A calorie-free sweetener that has been used in foods and beverages around the world for many years. The ingredient, which is 200 times sweeter than sugar, has been used in numerous foods in the United States since 1988. In the U.S., it is used in such products as candies, baked goods, frozen desserts, beverages, dessert mixes and tabletop sweeteners. Acesulfame potassium, which is also known as acesulfame K, is often used in combination with other low-calorie sweeteners because it enhances the sweet taste of foods and beverages.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other leading health organizations have found the ingredient to be safe for all segments of the population. More than 90 studies have demonstrated the safety of acesulfame potassium. The ingredient is currently used in more than 4,000 foods and beverages in about 90 countries around the world.

Zinc Gluconate

(also called zincum gluconicum) is the zinc salt of gluconic acid. It is an ionic compound consisting of two moles of gluconate for each mole of zinc. Zinc gluconate is a popular form for the delivery of zinc as a dietary supplementZinc is a naturally occurring mineral. Zinc is important for growth and for the development and health of body tissues. Zinc gluconate is used to treat and to prevent zinc deficiency. Zinc gluconate has been used in lozenges for treating the common cold. However, controlled trials with lozenges composed of zinc acetate have found the greatest effect on the duration of colds.

Sucralose

is an artificial sweetener. The majority of ingested sucralose is not broken down by the body, so it is non-caloric. In the European Union, it is also known under the E number, E955. Sucralose is about 320 to 1,000 times as sweet as sucrose,[4] twice as sweet as saccharin, and three times as sweet as aspartame. It is stable under heat and over a broad range of pH conditions. Therefore, it can be used in baking or in products that require a longer shelf life. The commercial success of sucralose-based products stems from its favourable comparison to other low-calorie sweeteners in terms of taste, stability, and safety.

Folic Acid

Folate and folic acid are forms of a water-soluble B vitamin. Folate occurs naturally in food, and folic acid is the synthetic form of this vitamin. Since 1998, folic acid has been added to cold cereals, flour, breads, pasta, bakery items, cookies, and crackers, as required by federal law. Foods that are naturally high in folate include leafy vegetables (such as spinach, broccoli, and lettuce), okra, asparagus, fruits (such as bananas, melons, and lemons) beans, yeast, mushrooms, meat (such as beef liver and kidney), orange juice, and tomato juice.

Folic acid is used for preventing and treating low blood levels of folate (folate deficiency), as well as its complications, including “tired blood” (anaemia) and the inability of the bowel to absorb nutrients properly. Folic acid is also used for other conditions commonly associated with folate deficiency, including ulcerative colitis, liver disease, alcoholism, and kidney dialysis.

Women who are pregnant or might become pregnant take folic acid to prevent miscarriage and “neural tube defects,” birth defects such as spina bifida that occur when the foetus’s spine and back do not close during development.

Some people use folic acid to prevent colon cancer or cervical cancer. It is also used to prevent heart disease and stroke, as well as to reduce blood levels of a chemical called homocysteine. High homocysteine levels might be a risk for heart disease.

Folic acid is used for memory lossAlzheimer’s disease, age-related hearing loss, preventing the eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD), reducing signs of aging, weak bones (osteoporosis), jumpy legs (restless leg syndrome), sleep problems, depressionnerve painmuscle pain, AIDS, a skin disease called vitiligo, and an inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome. It is also used for reducing harmful side effects of treatment with the medications lometrexol and methotrexate.

Some people apply folic acid directly to the gum for treating gum infections.

Folic acid is often used in combination with other B vitamins.

Phenylalanine

Phenylalanine is found naturally in the breast milk of mammals. It is used in the manufacture of food and drink products and sold as a nutritional supplement for its reputed analgesic and antidepressant effects. It is a direct precursor to the neuromodulator phenethylamine, a commonly used dietary supplement.

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